Das Spektakel der Räume II / The spectacles of the spaces

Die Ungleichheit des Raumes

Das Bild „Innenansicht der Nieuwe Kerk in Delft“ von Emanuel de Witte aus dem Jahre 1664, das sich in der Sammlung Residenzgalerie in Salzburg befindet, gehört zu der Reihe der Kirchen-Innenansichten, die den Künstler zu einem bedeutenden Vertreter von kirchlichen Innenräumen Mitte/Ende des 17. Jahrhunderts werden ließ. Die Darstellung der spätgotischen, kreuzförmigen Basilika (1381-1510), in der Säulen die Schiffe und Chorumgänge teilen, zeigt das obligate, weiß getünchte Mauerwerk, das seit dem Bildersturm die disziplinierte Ruhe in den calvinistischen Gotteshäusern verdeutlichen soll. Dekoriert ist der Raum lediglich mit Flaggen und Rautenschilde mit dem Wappen angesehener verstorbener Personen. Der/die Betrachtende ist seitlich im Chorumgang platziert und blickt durch das Hauptschiff auf die prächtige Orgel im Westwerk. Im Chor, hinter einer massiven weißen Säule ist das Grabmonument des ersten Statthalters der Vereinigten Provinzen, Wilhelm I., Prinz von Oranien, der „Schweiger“, zu erkennen. Dieses wurde vom Architekten und Bildhauer Hendrick de Keyser zwischen 1614 und 1622 errichtet, um den niederländischen Nationalhelden, der bereits 1584 ermordet wurde, posthum zu ehren. Unterhalb des Grabmals befindet sich der Grabkeller, in dem seither alle Statthalter der Niederlande und deren Familien begraben wurden. Sie ist bis heute die Grablege des Hauses Oranien, wobei die Bestattung noch nach den Traditionen des 17. Jahrhunderts erfolgt. Der Künstler De Witte lotet in seinem Bild die Gesetze der Optik und Geometrie des Raumes aus und setzt mit dem „beiläufigen“ Porträt des denkwürdigen Grabmals dennoch ein kräftiges politisches, aber auch künstlerisches Statement. Einen nahezu enthusiastischen Vermerk zu diesem Grabdenkmal stammt aus dem umfangreichen Werk des Historikers Pieter Bor (1559-1635) mit dem Titel Oorsprongk, Begin, en Vervolgh der Nederlantsche Oorlogen, das zwischen 1595 und 1601 in 37 Teilen veröffentlicht wurde und dessen Popularität wesentlich verstärkte.

„Pieter Bor’s history of the revolt, published in 1621, claims that the States-general of the United Provinces did not spare any costs to erect this work to the eternal memory of the prince. Although Bor probably extolled the tomb in his history because of its overt political meaning, it is the artistc merit of the work that he emphasized. He lauds De Keyser as the formost artist, architect and scultor of his day, and claims that even in its unfinished state the monument daily drew beholders and art lovers from far places to wonder at its artfulness. He encourages his readers to do the same, with the directive that this worthy memorial ՙcan be seen in Delft in the Nieuwe Kerk in the choir՚.“

Verhaelen, 2012, S. 100

De Witte fügt das Monument in einen größeren Genre- und Architektur-Kontext. Vor allem Kinder, aber auch Erwachsene umwandern das Grabgitter. Ein Mann mit rotem Umhang fungiert nicht nur als Repossoirfigur, sondern regelrecht als eye catcher. Auffällig und sehr typisch für Gemälde von De Witte sind die Gerätschaften des Totengräbers, der – selbst nicht im Bild – im Vordergrund ein geöffnetes Grab zurücklässt. Ausgehobene Erde, Knochen und ein Totenschädel lassen ein Memento mori vermuten, da auch der Junge im Vordergrund einen Windhund mit sich führt, der nicht nur Fäkalien in der Kirche hinterlässt, sondern schon seit jeher als Psychopompos fungiert.

„Mimetic representations evoke substitute and stand in for people or things that are not there. This is the enigma of the image; it offers itself as the presence of something that is absent… Like a funeral procession, art is a ritual of entombement… This effect is intensified in paintings of Calvinsitic churches, burial places in their own right and historical sites that mark the demise and commemorate the vulnerability of art itsself.“

Verhaelen 2012, S. 161

Der Tot also als beständiger Gegenstand der realistischen Malerei?

Das ästhetische, hochgefeierte Monument über einem Grabkeller errichtet, auf der einen Seite, der Blick in den schwarzen Abgrund, der den Blick in ein unsichtbares Reich der Schatten freigibt, auf der anderen Seite. Die Einladung der offenen Grabstätte als die seinige/ihrige, sieht der/die Betrachtende wohl mit sehr makabren oder zumindest gemischten Gefühlen. Hinzu kommt, dass De Witte ab 1650 den Blickwinkel in die Innenräume drastisch verengt. Die eigentliche Weite des großen Sakralraumes, vielleicht sogar der Welt an sich, wird zum Nahraum und imitiert so die Grenzerfahrung eines engen Grabes.

„The painting throws us back on Calvin’s dictum that the finite cannot contain the infinte…. The world, in fact, becames a nahraum, a closed and inclosing space or tomb, exited only by way of death…. Separated from the external world, the subject turns to the inner world, the nahraum of the self.“

Verhaelen 2012, S. 167f.

Literatur/Literature: Vanhaelen, Angela: The Wake of Iconoclasm. Painting the Church in the Dutch Republic, Pennsylvania 2012  

Diesen Artikel zitieren / Cite this article: Gabriele Groschner, "Wolken über der Weide bei Utrechts. Clouds over the pasture near Utrecht," in Tonale Malerei, 22. 4. 2020, URL: https://tonalmalerei.hypotheses.org/?p=2725

The Dissimilarity of the Spaces

The painting by Emanuel de Witte’s „Interior View of the Nieuwe Kerk in Delft“, 1664, which is housed in the collection Residenzgalerie in Salzburg, is one of the series of interior views that make the artist an important representative of ecclesiastical interiors in the middle/at the end of the 17th century. The depiction of the late-Gothic, cruciform basilica (1381-1510), in which columns divide the naves and the choir, shows the obligatory, whitewashed masonry, which refers to the disciplined calvinistic calm since the iconoclasm. The room is decorated with flags and lozenge shields of respected deceased persons. The viewer is placed in the ambulatory and looks through the main nave at the magnificent organ in the westwork. Behind a massive white column the tomb monument of the first stadhouders /governors of the United Provinces, William I, Prince of Orange, the „Silent“ is situated. It was built by the architect and sculptor Hendrick de Keyser between 1614 and 1622 to honor the Dutch national hero posthumously, who already was murdered in 1584. Below the tomb is the tomb cellar, where all stadhouders and their families have since been buried. It is still the burial place of the house of Orange and until today the funeral is done according to the traditions of the 17th century. The artist explores the laws of optics and geometry. Nevertheless, with the casual portrait of the memorable tomb, he makes a strong political but also artistic statement. The historian Pieter Bor (1559-1635) made an almost enthusiastic note on this tomb monument in his work entitled Origin, Beginning, and Continuation of the Dutch Wars, which he published between 1595 and 1601 in 37 parts and thus he increased its popularity.

„Pieter Bor’s history of the revolt, published in 1621, claims that the States-general of the United Provinces did not spare any costs to erect this work to the eternal memory of the prince. Although Bor probably extolled the tomb in his history because of its overt political meaning, it is the artistc merit of the work that he emphasized. He lauds De Keyser as the formost artist, architect and scultor of his day, and claims that even in its unfinished state the monument daily drew beholders and art lovers from far places to wonder at its artfulness. He encourages his readers to do the same, with the directive that this worthy memorial ՙcan be seen in Delft in the Nieuwe Kerk in the choir՚.“

Vanhaelen 2012, p. 100

The artist De Witte puts the monument into a larger genre- and architectural context. Children in the front and also adults walk around admiringly the grave grid. A man with a red cloak acts as a repossoir figure and above all as an „eye catcher“. A typical subject in De Witte’s paintings are the tools of the gravedigger, who we can’t see himself but has left an open grave in the foreground. Raised earth, bones and a skull suggest a memento mori. The boy in the foreground leads a greyhound, which does not only leave its feces in the church, but has also been seen as psychopompos.

„Mimetic representations evoke substitute and stand in for people or things that are not there. This is the enigma of the image; it offers itself as the presence of something that is absent… Like a funeral procession, art is a ritual of entombement… This effect is intensified in paintings of Calvinsitic churches, burial places in their own right and historical sites that mark the demise and commemorate the vulnerability of art itsself.“

Verhaelen 2012, p. 161

So the dead as a constant object of realistic painting?

The aesthetic, highly praised monument is erected on one side, the view into the black abyss, which reveals the view into an invisible realm of shadows, on the other side. The viewer realizes the invitation of the open tomb as his/her own with a very macabre feeling. De Witte drastically narrows the pictorial space and so the viewing angle into interiors from 1650 onwards. The actual expanse of the great sacral space turns into a nahraum, imitating the experience of a narrow tomb.

„The painting throws us back on Calvin’s dictum that the finite cannot contain the infinte…. The world, in fact, becames a nahraum, a closed and inclosing space or tomb, exited only by way of death…. Separated from the external world, the subject turns to the inner world, the nahraum of the self.“

Verhaelen 2012, p. 167f.

Das könnte dich auch interessieren …

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.

Diese Website verwendet Akismet, um Spam zu reduzieren. Erfahre mehr darüber, wie deine Kommentardaten verarbeitet werden.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search